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#Exhibit of the Month

Pottery, especially fired clay vessels, is the most common archaeological material found at the sites of the Thracian-Getae-Dacian civilization.

Specific to the Getae ceramics is the hand-shaping of vessels, without a potter's wheel, unknown, by the way, to our most distant ancestors in the 6th-3rd centuries BC.

Getae potters used a porous clay body made of clay mixed with various ingredients like crushed shards and shells, crushed limestone, coarse sand, and so on to make their wares. When fired in special kiln, wares acquired different colors and shades: from black to gray or yellowish-red. The richest collection of Getae vessels on the territory of the Republic of Moldova comes from the Getae fortress of Butuceni, where for the first time in 1946 the Russian archaeologist G. Smirnov discovered the remains of the fortress with the remains of stone walls and earthen ramparts, which he called a Scythian fortress (sic!). The subsequent excavations for 20 years, with more or less lasting interruptions, revealed traces of intense habitation that lasted more than three centuries at a promontory near the village of Butuceni (The Old Orhei Cultural and Natural Reserve), of the largest Getae fortress on the territory of the Republic of Moldova.

Among the vessels discovered by archaeologists, there are some gigantic (analogues of these samples of Getae ceramic ware are currently not known). They are considered vessels for storing supplies, especially grain (it is known that the Getae, the sedentary people of these lands, were engaged in agriculture, cattle breeding and various crafts). Among the cereals grown by the Geto-Dacians, there were wheat, millet, barley, oats, and rye; such products, necessary for the local cuisine, had to be stored for a longer period under special conditions. For these purposes, large vessels (chiups) were used, placed in special places, usually in the cellars.

The chiup vessel from Butuceni is one of the oldest Getae ceramics in the present territory of the Republic of Moldova, discovered during the excavations of G. Smirnov in 1947. The vessel has an ovoid body with a long neck expanding towards the top and a large lip bent outward; it is equipped with four knobs located on the line of the maximum diameter of the body. The chiup is decorated with relief ornaments, different in shape and size, located in different parts of its body: "commas" (schematic rhytons (?)) and wavy lines in the shape of a horseshoe or omega. The color of the vessel varies from dark gray to yellowish; the surface is carefully polished.

Dimensions of the vessel: H - 680 mm; D max - 430 mm; D of the lip - 340x360 mm; H of the neck - 170 mm; D of the bottom - 170 mm.


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Exhibitions

„World Press Photo 2021”

November 10 - December 1, 2021

The World Press Photo 2021 Exhibition opened at the National Museum of History of Moldova: "The photos reflect the problems that cause strong emotions and leave no one indifferent".

For the fifth year in a row, the Republic of Moldova hosts the international exhibition World Press Photo, organized by the World Press Photo Foundation in the Netherlands in partnership with the Center for Independent Journalism with the support of the Office of the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Chisinau. The opening of the exhibition entitled "Stories that Matter" took place on Wednesday, November 10, 2021, at the National Museum of History of Moldova.

The opening of the exhibition was attended by ambassadors and representatives of international organizations from Chisinau, as well as journalists, photojournalists, students.

Floris van Eijk, Head of the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Chisinau, made a speech in Romanian, in which he praised the efforts of the World Press Photo Foundation in the Netherlands to support photojournalism in the field of human rights. "The exhibition reflects stories from all over the world, seen through the lens of photographers. These stories are a synthesis of the most important and shocking events of the year. Thus, this exhibition is a unique opportunity to live or relive events that marked humanity last year. In particular, the exhibition focuses on stories that represent human rights challenges. The images in the exhibition show these challenges in a way that sometimes arouses strong emotions, and, of course, leave no one indifferent. Thus, the exhibition creates a bridge of direct and unequivocal communication with the spectator", said Floris van Eijk.

 

 

 

On the occasion of the opening of the exhibition, Raphael Dias e Silva, the coordinator of World Press Photo Exhibitions, Netherlands, arrived in Chisinau, who mentioned that World Press Photo annually celebrates the work of photographers and journalists who endanger their lives in an effort to provide the public with reliable information.

"This year the jury has selected 45 winners in eight nominations. From the efforts of health workers to solutions to climate change, from the Black Lives Matter protests to the unique story of the rescue of a giraffe in Kenya, the stories they tell span a range of issues. This year's collection also highlights how the COVID-19 crisis has impacted our lives, in both visible and invisible crises. In this sense, there is no more eloquent example than Photo of the Year - "The First Embrace" by Mads Nissen. It illustrates the first embrace of a woman in a care home in Brazil, through a plastic curtain, after five months of isolation and restrictions. This portrait reflects hope and connection. In fact, this is the feeling that we hope you will experience in this exhibition: cohesion, a drive for knowledge and a shared commitment to reliable news," said Raphael Dias e Silva.

Victoria Dodon, Editor-in-Chief of the Center for Independent Journalism, noted that CIJ is honored to contribute to the holding of the prestigious World Press Photo exhibition in Chisinau for the fifth time. "In this way, we promote the importance of photojournalism for freedom of expression and pay tribute to the difficult work of photographers around the world who document reality as it is - cruel, unadorned - and convey it to us. They do it in the most accessible form - an image that is especially relevant in the era of social networks, when we consume a lot of visual information. The title of this exhibition - "Stories that Matter" - underlines the importance of the messages that each of the photographs presented. In general, the exhibition retrospectively illustrates a very difficult year: Covid, armed conflicts, protests, environmental problems, migration, health problems, portraits of people who either suffer, or overcome themselves, or collide with the system," said Victoria Dodon.

Photojournalist Nicolae Pojoga emphasized the importance of the explanation to a photographic image, which in a few words says a lot. "Photography without research, without understanding the phenomenon, without pain and suffering and without appropriate text is a simple photograph. Today, the image itself is no longer an enigma; it can be captured using any electronic device. Much more important is the degree of the photographer's awareness and penetration into this or that problem," says Nicolae Pojoga.

Eugen Sava, Director of the National Museum of History of Moldova, where the event has been held for four years, highlighted the fact that the exhibition is valuable for the museum, and every year thousands of visitors come to learn the stories told by the winning photographs. "We encourage you to visit the exhibition in the next three weeks," said Eugen Sava.

This year, 4,315 photographers from 130 countries took part in the competition, submitting 74,470 images. The winners of the World Press Photo 2021 competition are 45 photographers from 28 countries: Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Bangladesh, Belarus, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, France, Greece, India, Indonesia, Italy, Iran, Ireland, Mexico, Myanmar, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Netherlands, USA.

The annual international exhibition World Press Photo travels around the world. It is held in almost 100 venues in about 45 countries and attracts more than 4 million people each time.

The first time World Press Photo took place was in 1955, when a group of Dutch photographers organized a competition to show their work to an international audience. Over the years, it has become one of the most prestigious photography and visual journalism competitions in the world.

In Chisinau, the exhibition was first organized in 2017.

Photography lovers can visit the World Press Photo exhibition at the National Museum of History of Moldova in the next three weeks, until December 1.

The event is organized by the World Press Photo Foundation in the Netherlands, in partnership with the Center for Independent Journalism, with the support of the Office of the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Chisinau.




 




Independent Moldova
Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic
Bessarabia and MASSR between the Two World Wars
Bessarabia and Moldavian Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic in the Period between the Two World Wars
Revival of National Movement
Time of Reforms and their Consequences
Abolition of Autonomy. Bessarabia – a New Tsarist Colony
Period of Relative Autonomy of Bessarabia within the Russian Empire
Phanariot Regime
Golden Age of the Romanian Culture
Struggle for Maintaining of Independence of Moldova
Formation of Independent Medieval State of Moldova
Era of the
Great Nomad Migrations
Early Middle Ages
Iron Age and Antiquity
Bronze Age
Aeneolithic Age
Neolithic Age
Palaeolithic Age

  
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#Exhibit of the Month

Pottery, especially fired clay vessels, is the most common archaeological material found at the sites of the Thracian-Getae-Dacian civilization. Specific to the Getae ceramics is the hand-shaping of vessels, without a potter's wheel, unknown, by the way, to our most distant ancestors in the 6th-3rd centuries BC.Getae potters used a porous clay body made of clay mixed with various ingredients like crushed shards and shells, crushed limestone, coarse sand, and so on to make their wares. When fired in special kiln, wares acquired different colors and shades: from black to gray or yellowish-red. The richest collection of Getae vessels on the territory of the Republic of Moldova comes from the Getae fortress of Butuceni, where for the first time in 1946 the Russian archaeologist G. Smirnov discovered the remains of the fortress with the remains of stone walls and earthen ramparts, which he called a Scythian fortress (sic!)...

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The National Museum of History of Moldova takes place among the most significant museum institutions of the Republic of Moldova, in terms of both its collection and scientific reputation.
©2006-2021 National Museum of History of Moldova
Visit museum 31 August 1989 St., 121 A, MD 2012, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova
Phones:
Secretariat: +373 (22) 24-43-25
Department of Public Relations and Museum Education: +373 (22) 24-04-26
Fax: +373 (22) 24-43-69
E-mail: office@nationalmuseum.md
Technical Support: info@nationalmuseum.md
Web site administration and maintenance: Andrei EMILCIUC

 



The National Museum of History of Moldova takes place among the most significant museum institutions of the Republic of Moldova, in terms of both its collection and scientific reputation.
©2006-2021 National Museum of History of Moldova
Visit museum 31 August 1989 St., 121 A, MD 2012, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova
Phones:
Secretariat: +373 (22) 24-43-25
Department of Public Relations and Museum Education: +373 (22) 24-04-26
Fax: +373 (22) 24-43-69
E-mail: office@nationalmuseum.md
Technical Support: info@nationalmuseum.md
Web site administration and maintenance: Andrei EMILCIUC

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