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#Exhibit of the Month

The history of silverware goes back over 5,000 years, but only in the 3rd millennium BC, in Mesopotamia and Anatolia, the first pieces of processed silver were made. From there, the art of working with silver spread to Persia and to Europe, where already in Roman and Greek antiquity it reached a high level of skill. Many of the techniques used then, such as casting, embossing and engraving, are still used today.

The National Museum of History of Moldova possesses a rich collection of silver items, which in a special way reflects the everyday life of people of the 18th-20th centuries. The typological range of objects that make up the collection includes both secular and ecclesiastical silverware: fruit vases, bonbonnieres, cutlery, tea and coffee preparation and serving sets, salt-cellars, handbags, snuffboxes and cigarette cases, candelabra, as well as icon cases, chalices, pectoral crosses, candlesticks, and so on.

Products of renowned jewelers, such as Fabergé, Khlebnikov, Sazikov in Russia, Elkington in England, Christofle in France or Norblin and Fraget in Poland stand out for their special quality and luxury. A significant item in the museum's silverware collection is the teapot on a stand with a spirit lamp (bouillotte), made in the Christofle workshop in France.

The Christofle workshop was founded in Paris in 1830 by Charles Christofle. The workshop, which was the court supplier of the Emperor of France Napoleon III, the Emperor of Mexico and the Tsar of Russia, created decorative and household pieces of rare beauty. It was also highly appreciated by the Royal House of Romania, which granted the workshop a supplier patent. In 1842, Charles Christofle bought a patent for electroplating, a technique that involved first coating a metal base with copper and then with nickel and silver. It was this technique that allowed him to mass-produce silver tea sets, which were very popular at the time. Tea, brought to Europe in 1610 by the East India Company, was an expensive commodity that gradually gained popularity. The oldest preserved teapots, dating from the 1670s, were small. As tea gained popularity, larger teapots began to be produced, shaped to match the fashion of the time.

According to Christofle catalogs, the model was produced in 1868 and fascinates with its elegance and refinement. The teapot has a complex design including a pear-shaped container, the surface of which is ornamented with guilloché in the Louis XVI style of the late 1780s. In the upper and lower parts of the body it is decorated with a border with tulips on protrusions, and in the center, it has an escutcheon with an engraved double frame. The teapot is equipped with a folding basket-like handle decorated with triple rings, and a lid with a knob. There are two rivets on the teapot for attaching it to the stand. A spirit lamp with a straight handle and a device for lifting the wick is fixed in the middle of the stand. The item has the Christofle stamp and is made of nickel silver.

The teapot on a stand with a spirit lamp, made in the Christofle workshop, harmoniously combines the value of a unique object and a sample of a large industrial series.

Dimensions: H.: 43 cm; W.: 24 cm.

Virtual Tour


Publications Journal „Tyragetia"   vol. X [XXV], nr. 2


Portrait of Maria (Lupu) Radziwill in the works of the Polish painter Korneli Szlegiel (1851)
ISSN 1857-0240
E-ISSN 2537-6330

Portrait of Maria (Lupu) Radziwill in the works of the Polish painter Korneli Szlegiel (1851)

Tyragetia, serie nouă, vol. X [XXV], nr. 2, Istorie. Muzeologie

Keywords: Polish painter Korneli Szlegiel, Maria (Lupu) Radziwill, frescoes of the Three Holy Hierarchs Church, historical and cultural heritage.

Abstract: This article is an attempt to critically review the visual documentation regarding the Vasile Lupu time that are of great interest for the Romanian and Polish historiography. We tried to compare some fragments from the life of Maria (Lupu) Radziwill with her preserved visual images. The groundwork of this scientific approach are illustrated sources of the epoch, in particular the frescoes in the Three Holy Hierarchs Church of Iași, which have been renovated during 1880s, and the portrait created by Szlegiel in 1851 that preserved the original images of the church frescoes before their renovation. Our study substantiates the authenticity and singularity of the Korneli Slegiel's portrait depicting the royal family of Vasile Lupu for the reason that it preserves the original appearance of the 17th century frescoes. Unknown drawing made by Korneli Szlegiel was discovered in the Warsaw National Mseum (Muzeum Narodowe w Warszawie) in 2015. The images were exposed to interdisciplinary research, being examined from a purely artistic perspective as well as a cultural and historical point of view. The data of this study might be the basis of a subsequent reliable restoration of frescoes of the Three Holy Hierarchs Church.

List of illustrations:
Fig. 1. Three Holy Hierarchs Church of Iași in 1845 (J. Rey).
Fig. 2. Iași press chronicle on the activity of the painter Korneli Szlegiel in Iași (1851).
Fig. 3. Portrait of Vasile Lupu's family in the Three Holy Hierarchs Church of Iași, by Korneli Szlegiel, 1851 (The National Museum of Warsaw).
Fig. 4. Vasile Lupu's family, the votive portrait in the Three Holy Hierarchs Church. Fragments of frescoes recovered in 1888 and preserved in the Museum of the Three Holy Hierarchs Church, the Gothic Room.
Fig. 5. The image of Princess Maria Lupu (Radziwill) on a fresco of the Three Holy Hierarchs Church.
Fig. 6. Portrait of Tudosca and Maria Lupu (Radziwill) on a fresco of the Three Holy Hierarchs Church recovered in 1888.
Fig. 7. Portraits of Tudosca, Maria and Ruxandra from the Three Holy Hierarchs Church, reproduced by Korneli Szlegiel in 1851.
Fig. 8. Portrait of Catherine the Circassian in the Golia Church.
Fig. 9. Embroidered portrait of Tudosca (17th century) from the Museum of the Three Holy Hierarchs Church. Fig. 10. Votive portrait from the Three Holy Hierarchs Church painted in 1884.

Lilia Zabolotnaia
The strength and weakness of Alexandra Osipovna Smirnova-Rosset (on the history of the origins of one of the women of the Pushkin era)
Tyragetia, serie nouă, vol. XII [XXVII], nr. 2, Istorie. Muzeologie
Lilia Zabolotnaia
The bounds of the private in the life of Antiochus Cantemir: Myths, speculations and realness regarding his secret family in Paris
Tyragetia, serie nouă, vol. XIV [XXIX], nr. 2, Istorie. Muzeologie
Lilia Zabolotnaia
Testament of Moldavian princess Maria (Lupu) Radziwill from 1659
Tyragetia, serie nouă, vol. XIII [XXVIII], nr. 2, Istorie. Muzeologie
Lilia Zabolotnaia
The conditions of the marriage concluding in the Middle Ages. Comparative study
Tyragetia, serie nouă, vol. I [XVI], nr. 2, Istorie. Muzeologie Chișinău, 2007
Lilia Zabolotnaia
Some notes about Branković dynasty
Tyragetia, serie nouă, vol. IV [XIX], nr. 2, Istorie. Muzeologie


 

 

Independent Moldova
Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic
Bessarabia and MASSR between the Two World Wars
Bessarabia and Moldavian Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic in the Period between the Two World Wars
Revival of National Movement
Time of Reforms and their Consequences
Abolition of Autonomy. Bessarabia – a New Tsarist Colony
Period of Relative Autonomy of Bessarabia within the Russian Empire
Phanariot Regime
Golden Age of the Romanian Culture
Struggle for Maintaining of Independence of Moldova
Formation of Independent Medieval State of Moldova
Era of the
Great Nomad Migrations
Early Middle Ages
Iron Age and Antiquity
Bronze Age
Aeneolithic Age
Neolithic Age
Palaeolithic Age

  
  
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#Exhibit of the Month

The history of silverware goes back over 5,000 years, but only in the 3rd millennium BC, in Mesopotamia and Anatolia, the first pieces of processed silver were made. From there, the art of working with silver spread to Persia and to Europe, where already in Roman and Greek antiquity it reached a high level of skill. Many of the techniques used then, such as casting, embossing and engraving, are still used today...

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The National Museum of History of Moldova takes place among the most significant museum institutions of the Republic of Moldova, in terms of both its collection and scientific reputation.
©2006-2022 National Museum of History of Moldova
Visit museum 31 August 1989 St., 121 A, MD 2012, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova
Phones:
Secretariat: +373 (22) 24-43-25
Department of Public Relations and Museum Education: +373 (22) 24-04-26
Fax: +373 (22) 24-43-69
E-mail: office@nationalmuseum.md
Technical Support: info@nationalmuseum.md
Web site administration and maintenance: Andrei EMILCIUC

 



The National Museum of History of Moldova takes place among the most significant museum institutions of the Republic of Moldova, in terms of both its collection and scientific reputation.
©2006-2022 National Museum of History of Moldova
Visit museum 31 August 1989 St., 121 A, MD 2012, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova
Phones:
Secretariat: +373 (22) 24-43-25
Department of Public Relations and Museum Education: +373 (22) 24-04-26
Fax: +373 (22) 24-43-69
E-mail: office@nationalmuseum.md
Technical Support: info@nationalmuseum.md
Web site administration and maintenance: Andrei EMILCIUC

menu
The National Museum of History of Moldova takes place among the most significant museum institutions of the Republic of Moldova, in terms of both its collection and scientific reputation.
©2006-2022 National Museum of History of Moldova
Visit museum 31 August 1989 St., 121 A, MD 2012, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova
Phones:
Secretariat: +373 (22) 24-43-25
Department of Public Relations and Museum Education: +373 (22) 24-04-26
Fax: +373 (22) 24-43-69
E-mail: office@nationalmuseum.md
Technical Support: info@nationalmuseum.md
Web site administration and maintenance: Andrei EMILCIUC